MetalBryan

Vagabond
Joined
May 30, 2018
Messages
194
Location
Miami, FL
The reason I am posting this is sort of self-reflective but maybe some of you will find a useful peice of information. I am finally staring down an eviction I always knew was inevitable. I don't know where I'll go, necessarily, but I know it will likely be around the new year - in winter as a good eviction should be. I've been working on this Alice pack of mine for a few years now, collecting things and making the occasional small purchase to create a general go-bag. I've added a couple things recently and now the bag is "full" in the sense that to add more I will have to take away.

I'd appreciate any thoughts about utility, glaring omissions, redundancies, or just a gut reaction.

WISHLIST
sleeping bag & mattress pad - I feel I have enough to go rough, but if I end up with a classy backpack I'll have to do some camping.
hiking boots - I'll need a new pair of shoes for the winter. I really like Merrells. I usually get a shoe for $50-70, and their boots run $80-100.
camping mirror
odor-barrier bags (for the food in the bag)
Dickies cover-alls - I feel like if I had a pair of these I could wear them for a couple weeks while rotating my socks/underwear/t-shirts.
READYMAN pocket stove - these stoves have 4 pieces of metal with perforated tools in them like fishhooks and arrowheads. - is $30 too much?


alice.JPG

This is Alice. A standard pack, I think. Used off and on for about 15 years. A little wear but has a lot of life left.
Alice is the biggest question - do I keep her or purchase something with more back support. I'm turning 40 soon, and I haven't been out-about with this pack in a few years.
I'm looking at the Berghaus Trailhead 65L and a couple of 65-70L Ospreys. Both in the $180-280 range on amazon. I've read the alice vs camping pack threads in STP and though general advice seems to be subjective I am specifically curious about back issues and these packs. It's not a financial priority right now but I don't want to regret that position a few months from now.


tarp.JPG
8'x10' 10mil thick tarp - Dumpstered this tarp, unopened. I think I can pack it entirely. Or do I cut it down, or leave it behind. Adding this to ALICE will fill it to capacity, very full.

bivy.JPG
2 person bivy tent - From a free-pile gravy train. Used but clean. Aquired recently. Checked for parts but have not tested assembly. Would have to strap to the exterior of Alice. Probably useless if I end up outside in the winter unless combined or replaced with other gear.

WHAT'S IN THE BAG:

alicecontent01.JPG
Keffiyeh
Dewalt safety goggles
x7 Cliff bars
Gloves, light gripping
Headlamp with batteries in pouch
2 Liters h2O
High calorie cookies. Total: 756g. 3690 calories.
24oz bottle, empty
Rain poncho in pouch

alicecontent02.JPG
x2 t-shirts, rolled - clothing goes in the bag after the outdoor multi-tool but before the interior pouch.
x4 pairs socks - haven't learned how to effictivey roll socks yet.
x4 pairs boxers - new & prerolled/taped. Because when it's time to go might as well start fresh.
Small red vinyl shopping bag in its own pouch - I can't decide if this is a waste of space or indispensable.
Money belt & zip lock quart bag - for the airlines, should this trip be so lucky
Large thick ply ziplock bag contains:
x2 5"x9" dressing
x8 3" gauze
First aid guide
Calendar-style diary

alicecontent03.JPG
Collapsing, outdoor multi-tool in thick canvas pouch - the pouch is necessary to protect the rest of the contents of alice from it's new, pointy edges and blades. This gets packed on the bottom of the bag. It will either survive the impact from a good long toss or blow the bottom of the bag out on impact. Any thoughts?
Multi-tool - from a free pile
Multi-tool in pouch with small screw bits - from nicer free pile
Small folding blade
6" hemorrhage control bandage

INTERIOR POUCH:

interiorpouch01.JPG
Black crafts bag, lightweight - this sits in the middle of Alice, offering a solid support where my back comes to rest on the pack.
Emergency foil bivy
Bulked-up first aid kit - added more bandages, wipes, antibiotic, small scissors, misc
Radio and AA batteries - these also fit the headlamp
Paper showers - haven't tried these yet, but I wish I knew about these when I lived in a van for 3 years. Don't know if they're actually better than baby wipes but they're larger towelettes in a better case.

interiorpouch02.JPG
x2 heavy-duty zip ties
Disposable razor - I'd need a ten pack at least to shave my beard. Probably a waste for me, but maybe trade? Scrape off a political sticker I don't like?
x3 hand warming pouches
Half-a-comb
Toothbrush with a handle that needs to get cut in half
Toothpaste, full sized - there's a travel size in the first aid kit. It seemed like a smart thing if this one explodes.
x3 beef broth cubes - for the sodium
x30 electrolyte and vitamin tablets - got these as a trial pack for free before these Nuun tablets became crazy expensive. You have to get an emergen-c vitamin packet PLUS an emergen-c electrolyte packet to equal 1 tablet.
Travel sized Gold Bond AND Baby Powder - indispensable products that should be considered first aid LOL
Pencil, x3 black pens, green pen, x2 wide sharpies - for writing in the journal, trading information, designing tarp shelters, making plans, making signs, give a pen away
Lime Green bootlaces - one of a few things I shoved in my go-bag instead of throwing away
Fishing line & various bells - for them sneakin sneakers
Binoculars, gift-shop quality - pass the time, trade value
LifeStraw
Magifying Glass - just to see if I can start a fire with it
x2 each sized military can openers
Phone charger, for my phone
Empty Zippo - should I carry the fluid? I bought a 3oz container of fluid recently and I don't know what to do with this thing. I like it but it dries out because I'm not a smoker. I feel like it has tons of uses and good trade value
Waterproof first aid tape
Earplugs in tube
Small tube of asprin
Exacto and blades in small box - I thought they might have some value for first aid when combined with the lighter?
Lighter, BIC
Pen flashlight - useless when the AAAA (yeah, 4) batteries die but it was a gift so I don't know...
Paracord with compass, tiny blade, bracelet
x2 silver dollars - sentimental value but have trade value too.
Duct tape rolled on a pencil in a bag


LARGE IMAGES
alice.JPG
alicecontent01.JPG
alicecontent02.JPG
alicecontent03.JPG
bivy.JPG
interiorpouch01.JPG
interiorpouch02.JPG
tarp.JPG
 
We sell all kinds of other stuff in our Etsy store!

Ezra Fyre

Wanderer
Joined
Aug 15, 2018
Messages
190
Location
New Orleans
Spool of heavy duty sewing thread/dental floss & needles.

.... And These (see pic) ... I keep needles in an "old" mechanical pencil leads container. Just leave string hanging out lid when you close it & they stay neatly together.
.... I LOVE plastic "travel containers" for Q-tips... They're surprisingly durable if you're not a douche to them. Anyway, they're great for holding little crap - like batteries or fish hooks spare razor blades buttons, safety pins condoms bandaids (your ace wrap Is awesome, but you're not going to be able to wear your shoes with it on your toes - you will get blisters! = Bandaids.) ... Your small guaranteed to be impossible to find can openers ;) ... Little shit that would otherwise quickly get scattered, lost, or trashed.

I also like little Tins - like Altoids or on pic Zombie's. Same function of the Qtips containers really. These just take a bit more abuse. & Having a variety of different ones lets me organize/separate crap and remember what I put in what. Like bandaids in Altoids can opener in Zombie's, with the extra matches - so I don't have to open every damn thing in a pack, just trying to find the can opener.
... When I took batteries, i specifically wanted the plastic Q pkg. Putting batteries in a Ziploc sounds awesome -: but condensation can from inside the bag, too - & then you go to use your batteries & they're just corroded. Instead I do paper towel & Q tip container. Paper towel absorbs stray humidity & the Q tip is nearly as water proof as Ziploc. I've never had batteries corrode that way. But don't do it in the Altoids tin! Just throw the batteries out now,! Never had batteries rust that extreme or that fast... & The Altoids tin rusted all to shit too, socks and s T-shirt got rust stains... Etc. Nightmare.

So, yeah. Only actually thing I see "Missing" is needles & thread. Even if you can't sew, it's hella easier to get some to sew a repair for you, if you've already got the tools! :) Oh, and bandaids - you absolute will want them. :)

20180820_163943.jpg
 
D

Deleted member 125

I deleted myself
i highly suggest investing in one of these bad boys

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00B4FY8YO/?tag=squattheplan-20


its smaller then a pack of smokes and even if you dont decide to buy fuel (anywhere from 9-20 bucks from a walmart of camping store etc etc) the threaded barrel means it will 99% fit with any canisters. its really nice to be able to heat up some coffee or what not even cook a meal with its pouring outside and you dont wanna set yer tent on fire. ive used similar systems for years and the only time ive ever had a problem was after i had been drinking and didnt realize the canister just wasnt threaded all the way down. total weight it just under 1lb. also get some good foot wear. also i didnt see any cordage maybe i just missed it? those plain hanes socks are gonna get torn up real fast if you can invest in some hiking socks, i thought it was stupid too but ive put miles into mine with others who had cotton socks and their feet were killing them and mine felt fresh and clean. gotta take care of them hooves.
 
Last edited by a moderator:

MetalBryan

Vagabond
Joined
May 30, 2018
Messages
194
Location
Miami, FL
1. Good looking out on the sewing kit. I've got a spool of button thread I can break some off. I'll see about setting aside some needles.

2. I have plenty of bandaids in the first aid kit. I bought a few of them when they were BOGO so it's an overstocked basic kit.

3. I hadn't though about battery corrosion from water and that's an easy fix.

4. A friend of mine & I were having a discussion about to-stove or not-to-stove. I'll look into this little universal propane adapter.

5. I'd love a recommendation for a specific wool sock that anyone likes.

6. I doubt I'd survive the apocalypse a week with this pack. Without hot coffee and a good night sleep I'd surrender to the zombies. Lol

Thanks for all the tips!
 

MetalBryan

Vagabond
Joined
May 30, 2018
Messages
194
Location
Miami, FL
The tarp I have listed would be used underneath the bivy/tent I have listed. It could also be cut in half for a "roof & floor" set which is what I think you are suggesting. I think this one, the 8x10 10mil, would occupy the same physical space as the tent in a pack. If i bought one it would definitely be camo. Do you have a gauge recommendation? 10mil is pretty thick, but I'd hate to spend $ on something easily ripped. "The dwelling" is a problem I haven't solved yet, honestly.
 
D

Deleted member 125

I deleted myself
I've found a lot of what you may need can be foraged as the need arises; unnecessary to pack for every possibility - go with probabities

youv been kicked down multiple 70l osprey packs, decently priced camping gas stoves and high quality decent priced tents too? kinda thought it was just me.
 

T Paradise

Pilgrim
Joined
Feb 20, 2018
Messages
42
Location
Metz
Are you using the pack with or without frame? If you are using it with the frame I would ditch it right away, because this pack is almost as heavy as some other people's entire gear. I used to have a "hellcat" modified Alice pack, I don't know the exact weight anymore, but I just googled and Alice packs with frame seem to come between 9-11lbs. People do cross country hikes with a baseweight that is under that. My current setup, which works for three seasons should be around 11lbs, pack included..
If you use it without a frame I suggest getting a sleeping pad to use as a backpad in the pack. I still think there are better packs for just about everything, with trainhopping maybe being one of the exceptions, because you need something more durable than for regular travel.
Since you are concerned about back pain I would simply leave a lot of the stuff you carry at home.
Also think about your sleep system and only pack one. If you have a tent you don't really need a tarp. If you can sleep under a tarp comfortably leave the tent etc. For hitchhiking and trainhopping I would suggest a bivy, maye with an additional small tarp.

Edit: For wool socks "darn tough socks"
 

MetalBryan

Vagabond
Joined
May 30, 2018
Messages
194
Location
Miami, FL
palmazon: I've found a lot of what you may need can be foraged as the need arises; unnecessary to pack for every possibility - go with probabities
(talking about q-tips, thread & such - perhaps it's time to reconnect with your creative, improvisational, TRUE nature...)

re: There's a lot in the pack that is perhaps too plentiful. Now that I've reached capacity, it's time to scale back... do you have any suggestions on things to omit?

SlankyLanky,: youv been kicked down multiple 70l osprey packs, decently priced camping gas stoves and high quality decent priced tents too? kinda thought it was just me.

re: I'm unclear what you're advocating here. Sorry.
 

MetalBryan

Vagabond
Joined
May 30, 2018
Messages
194
Location
Miami, FL
T Paradise: Are you using the pack with or without frame?
re: w/o.

If you use it without a frame I suggest getting a sleeping pad to use as a backpad in the pack. I still think there are better packs for just about everything, with trainhopping maybe being one of the exceptions, because you need something more durable than for regular travel.
Since you are concerned about back pain I would simply leave a lot of the stuff you carry at home.

re: any suggestions?

Also think about your sleep system and only pack one. If you have a tent you don't really need a tarp. If you can sleep under a tarp comfortably leave the tent etc. For hitchhiking and trainhopping I would suggest a bivy, maye with an additional small tarp.

re: the sleep system is my biggest problem, and not just because what gear I have now was all free. Are you suggesting a sleeping pad & bivy, if I continue with the alice pack?
 

Maki40

Wanderer
Joined
Jan 21, 2017
Messages
104
Location
Naples, Fl
Way too much stuff. My first time going off the grid on foot, I got all prepared and had everything minus the kitchen sink and my pack was so heavy I hiked way too far and fuck3d my back up and was crippled for a month. I'm a young guy too.
After a year, I had shed almost all my stuff except a sleeping bag, military bivy, lightweight bug net, backpack, 2 sets of clothes (one on me), small solarpanel and phone, food and water. You can walk so much farther with a lighter pack and improvise and learn to deal with some discomfort once in awhile like when a rain comes and you have to just wait it out in a bivy sack breathing out the side of it... or it gets cold or hot or buggy. Still much happier with the most minimalist of stuff to carry around. Learn to adapt to your surroundings.. instead of carry a tarp and paracord, keep shelter spots in mind like bridges or build a shelter from whatever resources are around you whether dumpster diving or building a debris hut in the woods. Instead of bringing a pot and stove, bring food you don't have to cook or can be cooked over a fire. My two cents :).. but also don't blame anybody for figuring out what works best for them. I still tweak my setup and try to lose as much pack weigh as possible.
 

MetalBryan

Vagabond
Joined
May 30, 2018
Messages
194
Location
Miami, FL
Mackie40: Way too much stuff... Still much happier with the most minimalist of stuff to carry around. Learn to adapt to your surroundings..

re: I agree. I think if I put this pack on and walked out of town I'd be a convert to the minimalist lifestyle LOL
 

Art101

Nomad
Joined
Aug 6, 2014
Messages
999
Location
Cheyenne WY
Just a thought.Check out Sierra Trading Post they always have good gear at decent prices.If ya dont mind last years gear lol.I have scored so.e good gear for cheap.
 

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