Do I even need a cooking stove? (1 Viewer)

ClashCityRkr

Wayfarer
Joined
Jul 26, 2018
Messages
38
Age
30
Location
South Silly, PA
So, I been thinking about my list for my upcoming escapades. Something about a cooking stove seems a little unnecessary. I can eat lots of stuff cold outta cans, and even still, with a proper mess kit, I could just cook over a fire. I plan on being out there for a long time. A year, at least. For any of ya'll who've been out there for long stints, is a cooking Stove really a necessary addition to an already heavy pack?
 
Click here to buy one of our amazing custom bandanas!

NagaPadoha

Lurker
Joined
Jul 15, 2018
Messages
5
Location
BC
Haven't done years, but I've been on the road about a month at this point. I don't use my cook stove every day, but I've been really grateful to have it. I definitely find that I start to miss hot meals when I don't have access to them, and I'm way less likely to spend money on fast food and crap when I can cook something once in a while. There are also a lot of places / times of year where it's a dick move to build a fire, where as a little camp stove properly supervised would be totally fine.
So it's mostly about your preferences. I really like a little hot coffee and oatmeal in the morning, and some hot food at night, so I definitely take mine with me, but if you're straight backpacking..?
 
D

Deleted member 125

I deleted myself
i have a etekcity stove that i use jetboil fuel with and the two together weigh about a pound, its well worth the weight to be able to heat up food or have a cup of coffee without having to build and maintain a fire imo.
 

Tony Pro

Vagabond
Joined
Aug 24, 2015
Messages
214
Location
Denver
Website
gavincwillow.wordpress.com
I carry around a little alcohol-burning soda can hobo stove (search on youtube) just for the sake of having it; depending on my plans I often don't bother carrying fuel for it.
I love a little fire, but the two major drawbacks are a) it's a pain when you want something hot for breakfast, and b) it makes stealth camping more difficult, for obvious reasons. In this scenario, do your damndest to hide all traces of fire before you go to bed, because if you get caught, a charred hole in the ground can mean the difference between the landowner not giving a fuck, or giving a lot of fucks.
 
Joined
Oct 11, 2017
Messages
75
Location
Rubber on asphalt; or dirt, or grass or gravel...
I would concur with the previous responses. It's nice to have one when you want it. A warm meal on an otherwise dreary day can be a serious mood enhancer.
As Padoho and Pro have stated, it will be a benefit to have a stove for cooking while in places where a fire is impractical.
Backpacking stoves are negligible in weight; think the brs style, and most can be fueled with either isop or propane*.
(*with the adapter)
 

scntfc

Newbie
Joined
Apr 16, 2017
Messages
23
Location
North Carolina
Just carry a bottle of alcohol and make you a stove on the fly. All you need is an aluminum can. There are plenty tutorials showing how to do so. And alcohol has plenty of uses for a traveler. It's also cheap.
 

Shaka

That One Guy
Joined
Aug 28, 2017
Messages
66
Location
76009
I carry two metal canteens that have cups with handles. Can hold a regular size can like ravoli and what not, with some room to spare. Can also just make a small fire with like some rocks to stand the cup on and boom, There ya go hot meal. Once done you can keep the fire going for warmth or snuff it out with a side sweep of ya foot with dirt.
 

Attachments

  • 1533123829711759214156.jpg
    1533123829711759214156.jpg
    409.9 KB · Views: 112

Koala

sleeps 22 hours a day, eats chutes and leaves
Joined
Nov 3, 2015
Messages
600
Age
24
Location
NY
Website
ciggybuttbrain.wordpress.com
I carry a little backpacking stove...not heavy, really and 100% worth it to have hot tea and coffee in the morning, especially when it's cold out. I can get my coffee without even leaving my sleeping bag! Plus hot oatmeal, pasta, rice and beans and veggies, & whatever else I can come up with
 

mouse

Rambler
Joined
Oct 22, 2017
Messages
86
Location
Dallas
A small stove (particularly propane or butane) can be stealthier:

  • lower light levels
  • less smell
  • quicker deployment and repacking
 

ClashCityRkr

Wayfarer
Joined
Jul 26, 2018
Messages
38
Age
30
Location
South Silly, PA
Just carry a bottle of alcohol and make you a stove on the fly. All you need is an aluminum can. There are plenty tutorials showing how to do so. And alcohol has plenty of uses for a traveler. It's also cheap.

This is honestly what i'm leaning on doing. It's just so simple and can be recreated in the event of any catastrophic equipment failures.
 

ClashCityRkr

Wayfarer
Joined
Jul 26, 2018
Messages
38
Age
30
Location
South Silly, PA
I carry around a little alcohol-burning soda can hobo stove (search on youtube) just for the sake of having it; depending on my plans I often don't bother carrying fuel for it.
I love a little fire, but the two major drawbacks are a) it's a pain when you want something hot for breakfast, and b) it makes stealth camping more difficult, for obvious reasons. In this scenario, do your damndest to hide all traces of fire before you go to bed, because if you get caught, a charred hole in the ground can mean the difference between the landowner not giving a fuck, or giving a lot of fucks.

This was the route I was thinking of going. Wouldn't a camp Stove create just as much light?
 
D

Deleted member 125

I deleted myself
This is honestly what i'm leaning on doing. It's just so simple and can be recreated in the event of any catastrophic equipment failures.

in my experience with beer can stoves they are drastically underwhelming.
 

ClashCityRkr

Wayfarer
Joined
Jul 26, 2018
Messages
38
Age
30
Location
South Silly, PA
Haven't done years, but I've been on the road about a month at this point. I don't use my cook stove every day, but I've been really grateful to have it. I definitely find that I start to miss hot meals when I don't have access to them, and I'm way less likely to spend money on fast food and crap when I can cook something once in a while. There are also a lot of places / times of year where it's a dick move to build a fire, where as a little camp stove properly supervised would be totally fine.
So it's mostly about your preferences. I really like a little hot coffee and oatmeal in the morning, and some hot food at night, so I definitely take mine with me, but if you're straight backpacking..?

Any obvious downside to the can & alcohol method?
 
D

Deleted member 125

I deleted myself
This was the route I was thinking of going. Wouldn't a camp Stove create just as much light?

a camp stove creates very little if any light especially if you invest in a cheap screen to block wind.

Any obvious downside to the can & alcohol method?

they are very weak compared to any other cook system, im talking like if you plan to do anything with it besides heat up coffee/tea yer gonna be shit outta luck.
 

sd40chef

Vagabond
Joined
Aug 8, 2015
Messages
195
Location
everywhere
a camp stove creates very little if any light especially if you invest in a cheap screen to block wind.



they are very weak compared to any other cook system, im talking like if you plan to do anything with it besides heat up coffee/tea yer gonna be shit outta luck.
I've cooked tons of meals with alcohol and beer can stoves. Lots of rice and lentil and pastas, oatmeal etc. Maybe not as good as some but for sure cooked a lot for awhile with one
 
D

Deleted member 125

I deleted myself
I've cooked tons of meals with alcohol and beer can stoves. Lots of rice and lentil and pastas, oatmeal etc. Maybe not as good as some but for sure cooked a lot for awhile with one

well shit what do i know? looks like op just needs a beer can stove.
 
D

Deleted member 125

I deleted myself
Haha whatever cooks his food I guess.. I have been stovelesson he road for awhile trying to lighten the load but lately thinking about getting cooking gear again.

like i said mines about a pound and thats well worth it for me to be able to heat up anything from tea to making burritos.
 

Users who are viewing this thread

About us

  • Squat the Planet is the world's largest social network for misfit travelers. Join our community of do-it-yourself nomads and learn how to explore the world by any means necessary.

    More Info

Support StP!

Donations go towards paying our monthly server fees, adding new features to the website, and occasionally putting a burrito in Matt's mouth.

Total amount
$90.00
Goal
$100.00

Monthly Goals

  1. Paying the Bills
    $50.00 of $50.00 - reached!
    The first $50 in donations go towards paying our monthly server fees and adding new features to the website. Once this goal is reached, we'll see about feeding Matt that burrito.
  2. Buy Matt a Beer
    $75.00 of $75.00 - reached!
    Now that we have the bills paid for this month, let's give Matt a hearty thank you by buying him a drink for all the hard work he's done for StP. Hopefully his will help keep him from going insane after a long day of squishing website bugs.
  3. Feed Matt a Burrito
    $90.00 of $100.00
    Now that the bills are paid and Matt has a beer in his hand, how about showing him your love by rewarding all his hard work with a big fat burrito to put in his mouth. This will keep him alive while programming new features for the website.
  4. Finance the Shopping Cart
    $90.00 of $200.00
    Now that the bills are paid and Matt is fed, perhaps it's time to start planning for those twilight years under the bridge... if only he had that golden shopping cart all the oogles are bragging about these days.