Featured Photos Koala's Ultimate Spring/Fall Gear List (1 Viewer)

Koala

sleeps 22 hours a day, eats chutes and leaves
Joined
Nov 3, 2015
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510
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23
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Australia
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koalagear-jpg.44832_Koala's Ultimate Spring/Fall Gear List_General Gear Discussion_Squat the Planet_10:56 AM



Hey there folks, here’s what I figured out works best for me when traveling in daytime temps of 40F-70F and nighttime temps of 20F-40F. I travel mostly by train and hitchhiking.


dsc00671-jpg.44833_Koala's Ultimate Spring/Fall Gear List_General Gear Discussion_Squat the Planet_10:56 AM



~backpack -mine’s a Gregory 60L internal frame - it was expensive, but I’ve had it for years and it holds up to all the throwing around/snagging on stuff/sitting on/tugging on the straps I do to it on the road. I actually got the pack before I started any kind of bum traveling. I was just doing some multi-day hiking trips at the time.
~sleeping bag (I use 2 bags stuffed inside each other, a Kathmandu synthetic ~45F bag and a super light & cheap synthetic 60F sleeping bag inside that)
~sleeping pad (I used an Alps Mountaineering comfort series pad for a while and loved it. I just upgraded to a 14oz Thermarest, pictured here)
~tarp & paracord (or tent or bivy) (pictured ~7ft by ~8ft lightweight tarp)
~camera
~thermals (its really essential to have a good base layer! Some kind of mid-tier quick-dry thermal legging and long sleeve shirt has worked for me)
~sweatshirt
~down puffer jacket (packs down super small and is super light. I swear by this thing)
~pants
~hat
~baseball cap
~gloves (I have fleece-lined swede fingerless gloves from Walmart)
~socks x 3 pairs (merino wool or merino wool blend are warm and long-lasting)
~tee-shirt x 2
~boots
~headlamp
~batteries
~charging cables
~phone
~battery pack
~headphones
~ear plugs (protect your ears, people! You only get one pair!)
~book
~notebook & ccg
~pens x a lot
~plastic document holder (I like to keep my papers/notebook/pens organized and semi-waterproof in this thing I got from Staples - pictured, it's above my backpack)
~rain jacket
~cooking stove & cooking pot (this is essential to me in cooler weather. Worth it just for making hot coffee/tea in the morning without having to leave my spot. Endless possibilities making curry, beans n rice n veggies, chorizo, oatmeal, etc.)
~utensils
~mug
~hairbrush

~lip balm
~lighter & matches (not pictured)
~day pack (small backpack, can help keep shit organized within ur pack too)
~toilet paper
~soap (not pictured)
~bandana
~hand sanitizer
~period products of choice, first aid kit, & medications
~deodorant
~water bottle
~sunscreen (not pictured)
~plastic shopping bags (not pictured, but necessary!!! Pack out your trash. You can also shit in these on trains.)
~toothbrush / toothpaste / floss (take care of your chompers, folks!!!)
~ID, money, etc.
~knife (not pictured)
~smiley (not pictured)
~scanner
~markals & markers
~duct tape (wrapped around a pencil)


Further Notes and Suggestions:


Battery Packs & Solar Power Systems
As of now, I only travel with a “solar power battery pack”.

Solar power chargers are usually 3 or 4 flap foldable cells and allow you to charge your devices when it is exposed to sunlight.

Solar power battery packs hold charge for charging your devices and have a solar cell on them, but are supposed to be charged primarily by plugging them into a wall outlet, and charged by the sun in emergencies and are advised to not be left in direct sunlight.

A system of both can allow you to charge your battery pack using your solar power charger to have charge when you need it!

Tools
Many people also travel with a multi-tool or other tools they find useful. These are all personal preference. I find an easily-replaceable 3in. blade assisted opening knife to be suitable for my needs, cooking and cutting fabric/thread/etc.

Sleep Systems
Sleeping gear is probably the most debated but most important. It is very strongly all about personal preference and what works best for you. I’ve traveled with a tent and with just a tarp and paracord and both have their benefits and drawbacks. This fall, I’m going to be traveling with a lightweight tarp and waterproof bivy. Tents offer protection from rain and bugs, and when its cold do a great job of holding heat in, but are heavy and require set up & breakdown and aren’t very stealthy. Tarps are easy up and easy down and stealthier, but never offer complete cover from the elements and leave you to be a target for mosquitoes and other critters. Bivys are essentially waterproof body bags that also protect from wind and offer a bit of extra warmth and respite from creepy crawlys. I’ll get back to you guys on how things go with my bivy!
 
Last edited:
We sell all kinds of other stuff in our Etsy store!
OP
Koala

Koala

sleeps 22 hours a day, eats chutes and leaves
Joined
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Messages
510
Age
23
Current Location
Australia
Website
ciggybuttbrain.wordpress.com
How much food/water are you able to carry for yourself at the most?
I usually carry a gallon of water plus my 1 litre Nalgene water bottle - that can last me about a day and a half, usually. About 2 days if it's cooler out and I'm not exerting my body the whole time. I carry about 2 days of food at a time, but in Australia when hitchhiking large distances between towns in the desert (800 miles between legit grocery stores), I carried 3 to 4 days of food and would fill up my water at gas stations along the way.
 

Bedheadred

Rambler
Joined
Mar 13, 2015
Messages
259
Current Location
On the road
I want a thermarest soooo bad. They're the best. As far as period stuff, have you ever tried a diva cup? It's pretty great for traveling, reduces waste, and saves money on buying products every month. Plus you always have it so you don't have to worry about running out of tampons or not having any...and they last for up to 3 years. I got mine for $10 on amazon.
 
OP
Koala

Koala

sleeps 22 hours a day, eats chutes and leaves
Joined
Nov 3, 2015
Messages
510
Age
23
Current Location
Australia
Website
ciggybuttbrain.wordpress.com
As far as period stuff, have you ever tried a diva cup?
Yes! I've had my cup for a few years now and love it! It was a little tricky to get right at first, but after that it's been awesome. I bring tampons if I'm gonna be on trainz during my period cause my hands get gnarly with dirt and grease and tampons are less invasive to use haha
 

Coywolf

Mastering the Art of Houselessness
Joined
Dec 12, 2014
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31
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Utah
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I’ll get back to you guys on how things go with my bivy!
I rock the Outdoor Research Advanced bivy. 3 lbs and super nice. Poles to keep it off your head and open for ventilation, even during a downpour. Very stealthy to boot.

The USMC bivy is a nice option as well, much more durable and up to hopping freight.
 
OP
Koala

Koala

sleeps 22 hours a day, eats chutes and leaves
Joined
Nov 3, 2015
Messages
510
Age
23
Current Location
Australia
Website
ciggybuttbrain.wordpress.com
Outdoor Research Advanced bivy
I looked into that one briefly! That will probably be something I invest in, in the future. I ended up with the US Military issue bivy...digital camo. It weighs maybe a pound n a half and definitely seems like it will hold up on trains!

Really looking forward to the extra barrier from the wind and rain, that isn't just a tarp haphazardly thrown around me that's probably actually just waving like a flag off the side of the train xD
 

quad8

Nowhere bound...
Joined
May 6, 2014
Messages
563
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36
Current Location
Brunswick, Georgia
How many people would carry a pair of needle nose vice-grip (channel lock) pliers? I can use pliers for self defense in case some idiot wants to choke me to death, put me on physical hold or something.

Those pliers can also be used to un-thread wiring on most fences (where each wiring end is bent) which act as chain-links. As you potentially un-thread through each link from the bottom, you will slowly reveal an opening you can crawl under. Legally, you don't want to un-thread any fencing you don't own as it will potentially lead you to being framed/nailed for vandalism if caught.
 

Antlered

Lurker
Joined
Apr 23, 2018
Messages
18
Current Location
Forests
How many people would carry a pair of needle nose vice-grip (channel lock) pliers? I can use pliers for self defense in case some idiot wants to choke me to death, put me on physical hold or something.

Those pliers can also be used to un-thread wiring on most fences (where each wiring end is bent) which act as chain-links. As you potentially un-thread through each link from the bottom, you will slowly reveal an opening you can crawl under. Legally, you don't want to un-thread any fencing you don't own as it will potentially lead you to being framed/nailed for vandalism if caught.
Me. I carry a set of 4" vice grips and a small crecent wrench. They've fixed more cars and gotten me out of more jams than I care to count. The vice grips have more pinch force, and more endurance than your meatsticks will ever have. Especially when it's cold. Tools for a vagabond are like superpowers. With great power comes great responsibility. Only use your powers for good. Or at least, not evil. OK, whatever. Just don't get caught.
 

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