If you had to live on a bike the rest of your life? (1 Viewer)

SaltyCrew

∆-FLY LOW-∆
Joined
Sep 21, 2018
Messages
121
Age
31
Location
Midwest
This is my bicycle, my friend build this for me back in 2008. Build on a Nashbar frame. I even got hit by a motor vehicle back in 2010. The bike survive! Getting ready for a road trip next month. I use a memory foam seat cover.
Does your fork have a lock-out?
 
We sell all kinds of other stuff in our Etsy store!

SaltyCrew

∆-FLY LOW-∆
Joined
Sep 21, 2018
Messages
121
Age
31
Location
Midwest
No, it does not.
Maybe consider upgrading to one with a lock out before you start touring. Lots of wasted pedal stroke on pavement when the fork is compressing as you pedal. Finding a used one at a bike shop or bike swap is pretty easy, as everyone likes to upgrade from their factory ones. Just a thought!
 
D

Deleted member 24579

I closed my account
Yo, for (less than) a G bar you could fully tweak and customize a 26" retro mtb from the 80s-90s. Those bikes are great basis' for builds, strong tubing, a multitude of parts to fit your bike of choice versus new, finnicky compatible parts. They can come in wavy ass color ways and, the bike would be damn unique. Not a copy off the shelves that Timmy down the street could have too. Here is my '91/'93 Novara Arriba ($140 on craigs, put probably $500 of parts into it)
That's a beautiful machine.
 

BradKajukenbo

Vagabond
Joined
Jun 5, 2019
Messages
208
Age
45
Location
Redding, California
50739


I won this in a raffle drawling. I don't really ride a bicycle much. My son uses it when he goes out. He is in a constant battle with flats because of all the damn goat heads. Those slime tubes don't stand a chance against them.
 
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Deleted member 25142

I closed my account
I had to look that up I thought you were talkin about the genesis bikes walmart makes haha. I was about to say 🤡
Nope, this one is around 1800 dollars... but Im leaning more and more to just go with any cheap previesly used bike,, you dont need to worry so much,,, but the Longitude is one hell of a sweet ride, anyway,,, biking is allso overlooked in my opinion,,its freedom combined with independency and speed, just get your hand on any bike, strap a tent to the rack,, and just ride into the sunset, its addictive. Now Im saving up for a 5000km ride from sweden to portugal. /Noa
 

WyldLyfe

I'm a d-bag and got banned.
Banned
Joined
Jun 3, 2019
Messages
233
Location
tasmania
I just wanted to share something that may interest some, (btw.. this is a cool thread) maybe you guys have these in the states too, in some suburban areas some people ride these pushbikes that have a build in motor to them, iv ridden them before they go fast, these r not pictures i took but here is what they look like.

hqdefault.jpg


80cc_motorised_push_bike_21027663.jpg
 

Jackthereaper

Vagabond
Joined
Oct 5, 2018
Messages
281
Location
Earth
Gas bikes are nice, but my dream is this bad boy
51009

Weld up a little trailer and *ahem* “borrow” a bunch of batteries from those stupid little rental scooters, or better yet a few tesla packs. Mount up as much solar as you dare for the size trailer and a lil pos genny for if you need to recharge when theres no sun. For $1500 if you “borrow” the solar panels and batteries or $5k if you buy 160w (700w if you dont mind being belligerently wide and a bit long )of panels and 3 tesla battery modules you dont have to pedal! (If you cant tell im lazy as hell 90% of the time )
If you wanted to get sassy with it, you could mount a cover overtop of the trike too with solar panels, but be careful as you may be creating a wing!

The trailer could also be a pop up camper if you like projects

Its obviously going to be shit offroad
 
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Pedal to the Metal

Pedal To The Metal
Joined
Dec 28, 2016
Messages
33
Location
ELY, NV
All the suggestions I see are great but most importantly if you intend to spend the rest of your life on the bike i suggest you just go ride a bunch of different models. Go to different bike shops and take them for a test ride. Not that there are not a bunch of great out if the box bikes being built but between all the geometry differences, seats, bars, etc then adding human geometry to the equation it makes sense to ride a bunch. Brand names do a lot to convince people on that specific brand, it's called marketing. There us a particular bike brand that is very very popular for touring. Lots of people ride it because of the cool factor. I have personally fit riders to other bikes, even less expensive, without all the hype and they have been much more comfortable. Long distance cycling can be very uncomfortable if not fit properly. Careful what you wish for.
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Now, another suggestion, get the best wheels you can afford. A better wheel will lend you to a very durable and comfortable ride. If you don't want a bike with fatter tires, get a LHT or similar. Spend more on tires too. They are not all the same. As for gear ratios? I'd suggest 3x9 or 2x10. If you are going to spend the rest of your life on the bike you will have better and worse days, and plenty of places you will be thankful for extra gears. Or you will be pushing. If you ride enough, you will push anyway.
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Try and get good, better racks for bike. Tubus has been the best track I've found. Not able to break em yet. Waterproof panniers. I suggest Axiom, but Ortlieb and Arkel and other brands have their pros and cons too.
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Saddle: if you can afford a Brooks, get one. They hurt for a while, keep riding.
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Hit me up with any questions, comments, etc.
IMG_20190712_104925_606.jpg
 

Zbart1108

Rambler
Joined
Aug 28, 2017
Messages
56
Location
Just around the bend
O would recommend a Surly,Salsa or Raleigh. There are allot of different frames out there to fit different size people so you really need to test ride first, as well as there's allot of info on the met about bike sizing, I'd you don't have a bike that's fits you properly you won't be happy. This is my current tour bike I'm on now, Surly Crosscheck
 

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Older Than Dirt

I'm a d-bag and got banned.
Banned
Joined
Mar 5, 2019
Messages
525
Age
62
Location
Upstate
OMG, Zbart1108, i was looking at your pic and thinking "Jesus H. Fuck , what a stupid whiteboy pineapple dreadlock hair-do!", when i looked through the other half of my bifocals and realized you are a bald guy standing in front of a tree with linear bark.

Old Timer's Disease hitting me hard tonight, or perhaps all the strong homebrew i have been drinking.

My actually vaguely relevant contribution: This week, in a heatwave, i spent three very rough days cycling the mud/gravel C & O Canal Towpath trail in Maryland on a loaded-for-touring folding bike with 20" wheels (because i could get to Cumberland Md with it on a bus; of course Amtrak will let you bring a full-size bike for $20.) i bailed and marathoned back to Cumberland with my tail between my legs, when i decided my Swift Folder (an excellent NYC bike) was not going to do it on this mud track.

Probably no one else but me is stupid enough to try this, but if you are, it is a terrible idea.

The camping, unlike the riding on the clown-bike, was fucking amazing. There are free primitive hiker biker campsites (water pump, chemical toilet, fire ring, picnic table, large cleared area) about every 5 miles starting in big freight town Cumberland Md 184.5 miles to DC.
There is another trail (that joins with the C & O) from Cumberland running in the opposite direction to Pittsburgh (right over a steep mountain, but with more ridable crushed rock (i am told))

Will return with an appropriate bike. Recommended to all vagabond cyclists. Mostly flattish, being a canal towpath, with very short steep climbs/descents at the canal locks. Lots of mud .
 
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