Good Winter Shelters (1 Viewer)

A

AlwaysLost

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Well I'm 97.8% certain I will be sleeping outside this winter. The exciting part is that I think that i have found a place to make a semi- long term shelter. I've watched a lot of videos but I'd like some advice from people who've actually done it. I'm thinking Teepee because it would obscure and be heated with fire and hot rocks. Or would a shelter with a smaller footprint be better? Thanks everyone for your input.
 
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DrewSTNY

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Well I'm 97.8% certain I will be sleeping outside this winter. The exciting part is that I think that i have found a place to make a semi- long term shelter. I've watched a lot of videos but I'd like some advice from people who've actually done it. I'm thinking Teepee because it would obscure and be heated with fire and hot rocks. Or would a shelter with a smaller footprint be better? Thanks everyone for your input.

I really like the teepee form, but look to make something more like the Sami people used in the fridged north. A more squat design instead of the high peak of the plains Indians. I made something like a laavu a couple years ago that was sweet, but had no way for smoke to escape when cooking. If you have a decent sleeping bag, you can weather most anything as long as you can keep the wind from blowing on you.

I used a 10x12 and it was way too small. I think the footprint was only about 6' across. I want to try with a 16x20 next. That should yield about 8' across or more of the peak is pretty low.

Whatever you come up with, post up pics!
 

paiche

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Will you be putting a wood stove in it? I stayed in a little 14 ft diameter yurt throughout a winter in Maine, dirt floor with pallets circling to keep me off the ground. My little stove was on the dirt floor in the center. It was cold and dark most of the time. Wood burned up quick and even though I used warming rocks the dwelling just did not retain heat for long. I was always fine sleeping, getting up in the cold mornings had its challenges. The only thing was the maintenance was intense sometimes. Like if there was a nor-easter where snow just dumped on me I had to stay up and just stay on top of keeping the snow removed from the roof (it only got that bad once that particular winter). Things I would do differently: Get sheepskins on the floor, get more layers on the walls and have light better than candle light, reading in low light I found is bad for the eyes. that's about it really It was nice for the most part. Good luck!
 
A

AlwaysLost

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I'm trying to make it feel home but yeah increasing the warmth would be pretty cool too! I'm hoping to get a 50# bag of coal on rocks and heat it with that. But I'm going to need to rig up a ventilation tube.
 
D

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Tarp tipi is most simple cheapest form. Did it a bit but never long term. It's like paiche said takes good bit of wood to heat. My little
12x12 cabin pretty much is uninsulated with my tiny woodstove it'll will warm but it takes a lot of wood if it's bitter and mornings can be tough rolling out if you don't add wood throughout night. I spent most nights in my tent last winter house watching for my grandparents. Key is wind I think. That's the fucking worst sometimes. A good sleeping bag, winter at least zero degree bag can make life so much more pleasant. You just can't beat a good bag and dog sleeping tight to your side when it's ten degrees out.
 

Hillbilly Castro

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I cannot speak with certainty here, but I feel somewhat good about the use of Polyiso rigid foam board insulation. Two examples come to mind:

http://www.appropedia.org/Hexayurt_playa
Hexayurt_BFD_mod.jpg


Brian Campbell's housebike // "Human Powered Space Program"
http://pardo.net/bike/housebike/000.html
1408953075_c0eefe120c_o.jpg


In both cases, you have a super small structure being heavily insulated - or in Brian's case, nearly as perfectly insulated as a space could be. Foam board goes up to two or three inches thick, with R-values stretching into 5 and 6. (Interestingly, XPS foam does better than Polyiso: http://www.greenbuildingadvisor.com/blogs/dept/musings/cold-climates-r-5-foam-beats-r-6)
Brian, the man with the housebike says of the warmth factor in his structures (in a Portland OR winter): "In fact, the sleeper box is so well insulated that the occupant's body heat keeps it warm all night long. "It's like the Bahamas within seconds, even in the winter," Campbell said, "though there's no condensation problem because of dehumidifying windows."
Not sure what these dehumidifying windows are, but it sounds like a structure like his would be basically like a big sleeping bag. Take the idea of a sleeping bag - a pocket of insulation your body can warm up - can nest it like Russian dolls in four or five layers, and you may be able to live without heat in even the gnarliest climates.
The reason I like the Hexayurt is because with this idea, you could build a small one inside a bigger one, or build a lavvu / tipi inside of one, and from there have a woodstove and some extra space beyond what Brian's bike home would offer. If you own the land your on, or have permission, or won't get caught, I'd even rent a Bobcat for a few hours and dig a little ditch inside of which your hexayurt would go. Earth-sheltered, XPS foam insulated, with a little woodstove? Hell yeah. I'd pile some rocks inside underneath the stove as well, and sleep with a hot water bottle and consume about five times as much fat daily as they say you should.

I may be doing this kind of this this winter - building a hexayurt inside a squatted trailer with stove.
 

Hazardoussix6six

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Well I'm 97.8% certain I will be sleeping outside this winter. The exciting part is that I think that i have found a place to make a semi- long term shelter. I've watched a lot of videos but I'd like some advice from people who've actually done it. I'm thinking Teepee because it would obscure and be heated with fire and hot rocks. Or would a shelter with a smaller footprint be better? Thanks everyone for your input.
where you going to be doing this at?
 
A

AlwaysLost

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Life changed IM housed up for the moment. Christian couple saw me building a shelter and gave me a place. The spots totally blown up now but if you are in KC let me know and I can help out for a day or two.
 

Hazardoussix6six

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oh shit yea, I just saw this thread pop up on my unread section. didn't realize the date it was posted. hell ya though. I'm headed to Cincinnati for a bit then go back south from there prolly won't hit KC but if I do I'll hit ya up.
 
A

AlwaysLost

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oh shit yea, I just saw this thread pop up on my unread section. didn't realize the date it was posted. hell ya though. I'm headed to Cincinnati for a bit then go back south from there prolly won't hit KC but if I do I'll hit ya up.

Nice yeah I dont blame you. KC would not be my first choice to winter. I just was out of shape at the time. If i lose my place Im headed south.
 
A

AlwaysLost

I closed my account
I cannot speak with certainty here, but I feel somewhat good about the use of Polyiso rigid foam board insulation. Two examples come to mind:

http://www.appropedia.org/Hexayurt_playa
View attachment 39473

Brian Campbell's housebike // "Human Powered Space Program"
http://pardo.net/bike/housebike/000.html
View attachment 39474

In both cases, you have a super small structure being heavily insulated - or in Brian's case, nearly as perfectly insulated as a space could be. Foam board goes up to two or three inches thick, with R-values stretching into 5 and 6. (Interestingly, XPS foam does better than Polyiso: http://www.greenbuildingadvisor.com/blogs/dept/musings/cold-climates-r-5-foam-beats-r-6)
Brian, the man with the housebike says of the warmth factor in his structures (in a Portland OR winter): "In fact, the sleeper box is so well insulated that the occupant's body heat keeps it warm all night long. "It's like the Bahamas within seconds, even in the winter," Campbell said, "though there's no condensation problem because of dehumidifying windows."
Not sure what these dehumidifying windows are, but it sounds like a structure like his would be basically like a big sleeping bag. Take the idea of a sleeping bag - a pocket of insulation your body can warm up - can nest it like Russian dolls in four or five layers, and you may be able to live without heat in even the gnarliest climates.
The reason I like the Hexayurt is because with this idea, you could build a small one inside a bigger one, or build a lavvu / tipi inside of one, and from there have a woodstove and some extra space beyond what Brian's bike home would offer. If you own the land your on, or have permission, or won't get caught, I'd even rent a Bobcat for a few hours and dig a little ditch inside of which your hexayurt would go. Earth-sheltered, XPS foam insulated, with a little woodstove? Hell yeah. I'd pile some rocks inside underneath the stove as well, and sleep with a hot water bottle and consume about five times as much fat daily as they say you should.

I may be doing this kind of this this winter - building a hexayurt inside a squatted trailer with stove.

That's epic bro. If I end up outside I will totally build something similar. Way better than my Teepee and fire idea.
 

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