Can you walk long distances with a heavy pack? (1 Viewer)

Romanriff

Lurker
Joined
Sep 11, 2019
Messages
13
Hometown
Oakland
I usually have no problem walking long distances, in fact I kinda like the satisfaction I get from walking town to town. I got a new pack that holds a lot more stuff but I don't know if i'll be able to walk long distances lugging it around. I don't know how much it weighs but the pack is almost full and is about 70L.
 
Click here to buy one of our amazing custom bandanas!

Hazardoussix6six

RideBikesPlayPolo
Joined
Jun 14, 2016
Messages
469
Age
30
Hometown
Cincinnati ,OH
Depends on what u need and what u want.....bigger packs r nice especially winter wise. But u usually, in my experience , carry more useless things than u need with a larger pack...victim of it also. Why I try to travel light with a small pack when I can
 

WyldLyfe

I'm a d-bag and got banned.
Banned
Joined
Jun 3, 2019
Messages
241
Hometown
tasmania
You can do it, if you practice an train and master the craft whatever it be, you want to carry a heavy pack and have it not bother you? practice walking with weights in a back pack and make it more heavy over time till you can handle it.. you want to handle the cold better? spend nights sitting in cold places like forests on mountains in winter and in the rain, you want tough feet, walk barefoot more, want to learn to sail a boat go to a boat school, want to lose fear of or be more comfortable with the idea of death, sleep in cemeteries, be unstoppable & master the game.
 

SlankyLanky

stp user voted "the friendliest mod"
Staff member
Moderator
Joined
Jan 26, 2008
Messages
3,075
Age
33
Hometown
richmond virginia, the east coasts portland.
I usually have no problem walking long distances, in fact I kinda like the satisfaction I get from walking town to town. I got a new pack that holds a lot more stuff but I don't know if i'll be able to walk long distances lugging it around. I don't know how much it weighs but the pack is almost full and is about 70L.
i dont know what kinda gear you have, but a 70l pack thats almost full is most likely going to be heavy as hell. i like to stick to 45-55l packs and i cant ever recall thinking i needed much more space.

with that being said over the years iv learned what to bring and what not to bring and also have invested some decent money into lighter weight and smaller gear which helps a ton.
 

BirdDaddy

Born Wild
StP Supporter
Joined
Mar 22, 2017
Messages
420
Age
30
Hometown
Spun Junction CO
I was once told by a military vet that you will never be comfortable humping a Ruck. It's a matter of becoming comfortable with being uncomfortable. I've humped 60 70 lb rucks for miles and miles and miles... You'll get used to it depends on how bad you need what's in it I had calluses on my shoulders and the top of my back on my shoulder blades on my kidney where my straps rubbed you'll get tough...
 

Stiv Rhodes

Rambler
Joined
Dec 14, 2013
Messages
94
Age
36
Hometown
Bremerton, WA
I have an 85L pack which I love, and it gets real uncomfortable to carry long distances fully loaded. The larger packs do carry moderate weight (30 lbs or so) more comfortably than a fully loaded medium sized hiking pack though, due to the more sophisticated frame and strap rigging. I like having the extra cargo capacity for the warmer time of the day when I take my coat off or when I've just picked up food, but I generally don't keep the bag full, and if hiking is how I'm getting where I'm going, a full bag is out of the question.
 

Hudson

Pilgrim
Joined
Aug 9, 2018
Messages
156
Hometown
Norcal
Just had shoulder surgery and it didn't heal well. Biggest downside is I think it limits me on weight for a pack. Sucks. I might be able to work through it but we will see.
 

Coywolf

Mastering the Art of Houselessness
Staff member
Moderator
Joined
Dec 12, 2014
Messages
2,126
Age
32
Hometown
Northern Arizona
Website
www.youtube.com
I really think it matters on what kind of 65-70 liter pack you are carrying. If you are rocking an Alice pack, that shit is going to hurt after a while.

I have a 70L Osprey Aether, which is specifically designed to carry heavy/awkward loads for long distances over multiple days, and I have loaded that thing down for long hop outs. Like 2 gals of water, a 12 pack of beer, handle of vodka, and premade foods. I think at one point I was carrying like 80 lbs across portland/eugene. I had problems with my thighs and knees, but not anywhere where the pack was contacting me. Lots of padding and adjustable straps.

But then again, I've been firefighting and backpacking long distances in the wild for a long time before that, so it does have a lot to do with physical conditioning.

My first hitching trip I carried a 75L that was over 80 lbs. I soon learned, as others have pointed out, to drop shit along the way that I didnt need.

Seriously though. Invest in a good pack, it could be the difference between you doing this for a long, or very short, time.

I wish I could carry less gear, but I travel through multiple different elevations/ecosystems in the winter, so most of my weight is cold weather gear and liquids.
 

Coywolf

Mastering the Art of Houselessness
Staff member
Moderator
Joined
Dec 12, 2014
Messages
2,126
Age
32
Hometown
Northern Arizona
Website
www.youtube.com
Also, and I know I'm going to get hated on here, but if you ever get a chance, try using a lightweight pair of trekking poles. They make a WORLD of difference. Especially being able to move faster, and taking a huge load off of your lower body.

They are not practical in all situations, like in hoping trains, but hitching and walking, hell ya.
 

train in vain

Wayfarer
Joined
Nov 15, 2009
Messages
456
Hometown
Out there
Right now..no probably not too far. When i wasnt so lazy..hell yes. Walked somewhere between 25-30 miles with about 50lbs on my back a few times. That was 10 yrs ago and i aint getting any younger..haha
 

Brodiesel710

Vagabond
Joined
Mar 5, 2019
Messages
786
Hometown
Winnemucca, NV
Website
www.ridindirtyface.com
Also, and I know I'm going to get hated on here, but if you ever get a chance, try using a lightweight pair of trekking poles. They make a WORLD of difference. Especially being able to move faster, and taking a huge load off of your lower body.

They are not practical in all situations, like in hoping trains, but hitching and walking, hell ya.
TREKKING POLES!!

HAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHHAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

I'd love to see a video of someone trying to board a train with trekking poles though.
 

Coywolf

Mastering the Art of Houselessness
Staff member
Moderator
Joined
Dec 12, 2014
Messages
2,126
Age
32
Hometown
Northern Arizona
Website
www.youtube.com
TREKKING POLES!!

HAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHHAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

I'd love to see a video of someone trying to board a train with trekking poles though.
I've done it more than once.....they telescope down to about 2 feet in length and can be strapped to your pack.

I was expecting to get shit for that, but damn. That was a bit much.

(Me not understanding sarcasm)
 

Stiv Rhodes

Rambler
Joined
Dec 14, 2013
Messages
94
Age
36
Hometown
Bremerton, WA
I have a 70L Osprey Aether, which is specifically designed to carry heavy/awkward loads for long distances over multiple days, and I have loaded that thing down for long hop outs. Like 2 gals of water, a 12 pack of beer, handle of vodka, and premade foods. I think at one point I was carrying like 80 lbs across portland/eugene. I had problems with my thighs and knees, but not anywhere where the pack was contacting me. Lots of padding and adjustable straps.

But then again, I've been firefighting and backpacking long distances in the wild for a long time before that, so it does have a lot to do with physical conditioning.

My first hitching trip I carried a 75L that was over 80 lbs. I soon learned, as others have pointed out, to drop shit along the way that I didnt need.
Coywolf, there's no way you were hitching around with 80 lbs on your back. My REI 85L hiking pack is only rated for 40 lbs. I've put 52 lbs exactly (6.5 gallons) in it when I was hauling water for my squat and my shoulders were killing me after a couple blocks. My bag also has a great strap and padding arrangement. It doesn't matter how strong you are or how you condition yourself, the shoulder straps chafe and bruise your skin if you carry that kind of weight for much time. For reference, a gallon of water weighs 8 lbs. 2 gal water-16 lbs, 12 pack of 12 oz cans of beer-8 lbs, half gallon of vodka-4 lbs, that's 28 lbs of liquid. Idk how much food and clothing you had but my 85L pack weighs about 40 lbs when completely filled with just cloths and a person eats about 3 lbs of food per day. But you're right about one thing, those Alice packs are shit.
 
Last edited:

Shaggy Rogers

Newbie
Joined
Jan 30, 2017
Messages
100
Age
23
Hometown
Dawsonville,GA
Walked about 35 miles one day, mostly concrete, 50lb on my back, flat shoes not meant for hiking. Not a good feeling afterwards. But it is possible, very possible actually. If the pack is too big think about putting wheels on it and make it a sort of suitcase thing.
 

texastraveler

Newbie
Joined
Feb 18, 2019
Messages
87
Age
19
Hometown
Pacific Coast Hwy
depends, i got a 70l pack with the hip hugger things, the shoulder straps aren't really necessary when i use em, they help A LOT. aside from that it depends just how heavy your pack is (full of clothes or bowling balls?), your current fitness whether or not you're in a flat or hilly area are definitely gonna factor into it
 

Stiv Rhodes

Rambler
Joined
Dec 14, 2013
Messages
94
Age
36
Hometown
Bremerton, WA
50 lbs I could believe. It's a lot and like Shaggy Rodgers said, it hurts, but 80 lbs, there's just no way. It doesn't matter how strong you are, it's not the muscles that reach their threshold. Its the skin on the shoulders and the knee joints that give out. Also, just by volume, unless you packed a set of dumbbells, a 75L pack doesn't fit that much, aside from whether or not you can carry it. Most of the volume you travel with is clothing and bedding, which isn't that heavy for it's size. Again, 80 lbs=10 gallons of water.
 

Coywolf

Mastering the Art of Houselessness
Staff member
Moderator
Joined
Dec 12, 2014
Messages
2,126
Age
32
Hometown
Northern Arizona
Website
www.youtube.com
@Stiv Rhodes oh, I'm sorry, let me bow down to your obviously all knowing and superior backpacking experience.

What a fucking entitled response, jesus. Try to consider someone may be just a bit stronger than you.

10L dromadary, filled. 20 lbs
Half gallon. 4 lbs
12 pack. 8 lbs
Pack. 4 lbs.
Sleeping bag. 5 lbs
Pad. 3 lbs.
Smiley. 3 lbs
Food. 7 lbs
Fire boots. 7 lbs
Sandals. 3 lbs
Clothes. 8 lbs
Guitar/case/books. 8 lbs
Random other stuff. 5 lbs.

That's 85 fucking pounds. So unless you were there. And watched me NOT hitchhike the entire length of CA with an 80 lb pack. You can take your opinions and shove them. Especially if they are wrong. Like this:

My REI 85L hiking pack is only rated for 40 lbs.
That is a reccommend operating weight. Not a max, or something you have to follow.

MY 75 L pack is rated for 55 lbs, but I exceed that on the regular.

It sounds like you really dont know too much about what you are talking about here. Especially saying that a 75 liter pack doesnt hold alot. That's ridiculous.
 

Users Who Are Viewing This Thread (Users: 0, Guests: 1)

About us

  • Squat the Planet is the world's largest social network for misfit travelers. Join our community of do-it-yourself nomads and learn how to explore the world by any means necessary.

    More Info

Support StP!

Donations go towards paying our monthly server fees, adding new features to the website, and occasionally putting a burrito in Matt's mouth.

Total amount
$0.00
Goal
$100.00

Monthly Goals

  1. Paying the Bills
    $0.00 of $50.00
    The first $50 in donations go towards paying our monthly server fees and adding new features to the website. Once this goal is reached, we'll see about feeding Matt that burrito.
  2. Buy Matt a Beer
    $0.00 of $75.00
    Now that we have the bills paid for this month, let's give Matt a hearty thank you by buying him a drink for all the hard work he's done for StP. Hopefully his will help keep him from going insane after a long day of squishing website bugs.
  3. Feed Matt a Burrito
    $0.00 of $100.00
    Now that the bills are paid and Matt has a beer in his hand, how about showing him your love by rewarding all his hard work with a big fat burrito to put in his mouth. This will keep him alive while programming new features for the website.
  4. Finance the Shopping Cart
    $0.00 of $200.00
    Now that the bills are paid and Matt is fed, perhaps it's time to start planning for those twilight years under the bridge... if only he had that golden shopping cart all the oogles are bragging about these days.

Latest Status Updates

> 6' away from Juan During
Juan Derlust wrote on MFB's profile.
Truism #348:
If it wasn't for these loose ends I'd have it all wrapped up...
MFB
Elevation! Getting HIGH! (I am thinking my gopro died, for some reason I didnt get a 360 from the summit)
Juan Derlust wrote on MFB's profile.
Juan Derlust wrote on MFB's profile.
I think your buddy Bukowski put it best Sundays kill more men than bombs
BBQ with STP homies in portland, feeling peaceful
I only feel good when I'm outside, but I gotta stay inside to get school work done.
It's a full-time job to be a good dad
You got so much more stuff than I had
I gotta study just to keep with the changin times
101 Dalmations on your CD-ROM
See me-I'm
Tryin to pretend I know
On my PC where that CD go
i have covid19 can you house me up
Georgia is now lockdown. Let's see if my dumbass neighbors will go out for their drugs.

Members online