Anyone Into Sailing From NC For The Summer?? (1 Viewer)

tacopirate

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I just got back on this site, but I'm staying in coastal North Carolina and know how to sail. Anyone want to try and head north for the summer? Any thoughts or ideas? I don't have much money but I know how to work on wooden boats.
 
We sell all kinds of other stuff in our Etsy store!

somn

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Marietta, GA
Are you looking for people to go in on a boat or what? I am in the southeast, have some basic woodworking and fabrication skills and could throw down a few hundred dollars, but dont know how to sail. Also don't know how old you are...If you are old I would not be down.

are wooden boats more expensive than fiberglass?
 
K

Kim Chee

I deleted myself
Also don't know how old you are...If you are old I would not be down.
Lol, my Mom is in her 70's, can run circles around you and can wipe her own ass.

@tacopirate, there's a few pirates here with boats even.
 
K

Kim Chee

I deleted myself
yeah. 19.
Makes you an adult.

To somebody else you're an old person;)

There's plenty of kids trapped in older people's bodies here.

On topic: Last I heard Florida is good for sail boats.
 

ped

Glorified monkey
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Gotcha kid lol wanting someone on your wavelength and junk


Then again what if you said I hope you're white and christian
 
F

FrumpyWatkins

I deleted myself
I always wanted to do the intracoastal (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Intracoastal_Waterway) and dip in and out of some of the rivers that flow into the ocean from Staten Island to Savannah. I'm pretty sure for a lot of the trip you could have a pretty small, lightly powered boat. It looks like the bay crossings and shipping channel wakes would be the only sketchy parts in a smaller craft. I've been in Chessie, Delaware, and Raritan bays and their feeder rivers, and depending on the weather are super sketch, however parts of the intracoastal are just a glorified canals.
 
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tacopirate

tacopirate

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Yea, I was thinking of buying an old wooden boat and trying my luck from there. Maybe head south?
 

somn

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Marietta, GA
Yea, I was thinking of buying an old wooden boat and trying my luck from there. Maybe head south?
Well if you start to go through with that plan and and want to share your sailing knowledge, in exchange for another person aboard to help out hit me up.
 
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tacopirate

tacopirate

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Will do. I'm looking all around the area for old boats right now. And yes, wooden boats are generally more expensive than fiberglass in terms of upkeep.
 
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tacopirate

tacopirate

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Thanks!! I grew up working on wooden sailboats and had a blast learning the art of restoring a wooden hull. No luck yet, but there are many places to look!
 

Durp

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Wood boats are beautiful. Too bad all the ones I looked at in my budget were quite far gone. You definitely have to know what sort of commitment you are making when you take on a wood boat. I was too timid of making a wrong choice since I did not want to get a survey to save costs, which led me to believe that I hadn't the budget to take on such a craft. Maybe the next boat when I know what I am doing better. :)
 
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tacopirate

tacopirate

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^^Yes, it is a commitment to buy a wood boat. I've had no luck thus far and I am considering going with a 70's Hunter fiberglass boat. The shame...
 

Durp

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What size range are you looking for? There are quite a few MK1 Yankee 30s around there, Albin Vega 30 is also a very nice boat. I doubt you will find a Rawson out there, but it might be worth looking into. I am a bit prejuduce, but the early ones where built with hand laid grp, to wood dimensions. They were some of the first fiberglass sailing boats ever made. There might be one with in a couple of states from you. They have a more traditional boat set up. If you go glass take the extra time to find a boat without an interior pan. You really want actual bulkheads. I really like Pearson's too. I don't know much about hunters, thought there similar to cals.
 
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tacopirate

tacopirate

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Interesting, thank you. Of course, bulkheads are key in a true ocean-going vessel. Hunters aren't considered to be that well made, though it really depends on the year. Weren't bulkheads originally on junk boats?
 

Durp

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I thought all boats where built using load bearing bulkheads until the late 60's in production boats when molded interior pans started being used to save costs on the assembly line. The older the better in my opinion. I would only get a boat with hand laid up fiberglass if possible, or pull the boat and look for cracks, crazing, and signs of blisters or delaminiation. If it dose not have any of that by now, chances are it will never develop. I prefer boats with uncored hulls and decks. Heavier, but less issues to fix.
 

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