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all knife sharpening tips welcome

Discussion in 'Weapons & Tools' started by ancient debris, Aug 12, 2017.

  1. ancient debris

    ancient debris Hungry for Knowledge

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    hidy

    Im a person that likes to take care of their knife, even if it means extra weight on my back. Ive spent countless hours over the years obsessing over the sharpness of my favorite knife, trying to make a blade razor sharp with inadequate sharpening tools.

    Ive since gained some intuitive grasp, by trial and error, about what kinds of edges are easier to hone as well what kinds of sharpening tools to use depending on how dull and how thick the blade is. But I am still far from perfecting the art of knife sharpening.. Since the tools I keep - a mini diamond rod, a wetstone, and a multi gauged bit tool equipped with porcelain for polishing - are comparitvely crude next to professional sharpening benches / heavy leveling vices, which I would never be able to lug around with me even if I wanted to.

    The thing of it is this: no matter how many sharpening methods you have at your disposal and or can bring to harness in conjunction, there are always those frustrating moments when the knife simply seems to refuse your efforts. Unless youre a pro, which I am not.

    So. Any pro tips I can glean from you? What kind of knife do you carry and what sharpening methods have you settled with, if any? And how sharp is sharp enough?

    Ive tried many things on dull blades, even anfew times tried the wheel of a rolling freight car to no great effect. . . Ive since learned one important rule: consistency is key. because sharpness of an edge is equivalent only to the proportion and symmetry of the angle, no matter how softly and meticulously you polish it. And thats why free hand sharpening can be so frustrating. That is, if you are a perfectionist.
     
  2. meatcomputer

    meatcomputer Hungry for Knowledge

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    Cant say this is the best tip but in my experience using carbon steel blades, they are much easier to sharpen, but they loose an edge quicker. I find them to be desirable. Also having a knife with a long tapered edge ~1/2 inch such that it's easy to rest the edge on the sharpening stone. This knife has suited me well for many years http://moraknives.eu/classic_no_1 very easy to sharpen.
     
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  3. AlwaysLost

    AlwaysLost Previously AlmostAlwaysLost
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    I hear leather strops work good, I just use sandpaper till I can get the hardware store to sharpen mine
     
  4. nivoldoog

    nivoldoog Sir Posts a Lot

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    First step is getting the right bevel on the blade. For deep gashes and really dull blades you want to first use a heavy grit stone to get a nice thick bevel behind where the edge will go.

    Then I go 10 on each side, then 9,, then 8. With a sharper degree then I used to build the bevel. A couple rounds like that on the rough side, then use softer grit to fine tune the edge with same 10, then 9, then 8... method.

    At this point you should have a fairly sharp edge. Now use a honing tool, car window edge, leather strap or even a 2x4 to smooth the edge for a razor sharp.

    I bought a stone at harbor freight for 3 bucks.