Living in cargo net high in trees (1 Viewer)

Joined
Aug 22, 2011
Messages
521
Location
Westernville, NY
I found these badass helicopter cargo nets from browsing around army suplus shit on ebay,
s-l1600-jpg.32045

with a 2200 pound load, 14'6" both ways, for $60. I'm about to stay for a couple months (???) in Brooklyn and was pretty impressed with an article from the NYT I found:
http://www.nytimes.com/2010/11/13/nyregion/13trees.html?_r=0
So I started thinking when I saw these huge nets: Why not go way high up, put up a cargo net, and live in it in, say Prospect Park or Highland Park? It seems like the folks in the NYT article are not going terribly high, but this guy is:
https://www.hammockforums.net/forum...IAL-How-to-hammock-up-high-in-the-tree-canopy
Doing it this way, you'd simply climb up, rappel down, and build a harness safety system with a second overhead line or two to always stay clipped into. If you found the right spot - massive beeches in an area with low foot traffic, on a hill, thirty-ish feet up - you'd never be seen, especially in some parts of BK way far out where there are no highrises. You'd toss a camo tarp above, lay out a few pillows as bedding and couches like some kinda oldscool middle eastern nomad tent, and keep your pack there. If there are more than one or two people, each person buys their own cargo net and sets it up in an overlapping fashion. Wake up, cook breakfast, rappel down, toss your harness and rope in your daypack and go grab your bike - Brooklyn on $0 a day. When the leaves fall and your position is exposed, take the whole thing down, throw it in a duffle bag, and head to NOLA or Key West?
I think done right you could make this happen on about $200, for the net, a dynamic line, a static line, a few carabiners, a belay device, an ascender, and a tarp. And it'd all add an extra bag weighing about 25-ish pounds - which is considerable unless you want the sort of setup that is conducive to longer stays in the places you travel, which I want.

This setup and a folding bike may comprise a travel/housing setup that is a very good in-between between straight backpack homeless life and being housed up in one place. A hybrid beast of both lifeways and their comforts, with neither's downsides. The primary downside is that you have so much shit - a pack, the treehouse duffelbag, the bike. I think it is the direction I'm traveling anyway.
 
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OP
Hillbilly Castro
Joined
Aug 22, 2011
Messages
521
Location
Westernville, NY
Also, a piece of plywood could be added for rigidity so long as some means of smoothing their edges was employed (to keep from scratching at the strapping)
 
K

Kim Chee

I deleted myself
Damn bird watchers have nothing better to do than look up in trees (with binoculars even).

Nice net though.

I'm guessing it is 14'+ on the webbing and not the panel alone.

Edit: I just found the same net on ebay.

The panel is 50" x 41" which is perfect for your average oompa loompa.
 
OP
Hillbilly Castro
Joined
Aug 22, 2011
Messages
521
Location
Westernville, NY
Haha yeah the panel is not enough, I'd intend on sleeping and chilling half on the webbing, or even covering the webbing with some material, maybe coroplast.
 
A

AlwaysLost

I deleted myself

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