Uluru aka Ayers Rock from the air (1 Viewer)

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Deleted member 22054

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Repost due to my old account carking it and not displaying any of my old threads. Pics from ground level will be in another thread soon. Hope you enjoy
 
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Tude

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Is that like a big "rock" that sits all by itself - just flat land around it?
 
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Yeah. Big is an understatement. Ive got pics from ground level. And yeah. The land around it is pretty flat for miles.
 

roughdraft

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yo..these photos are ::playful::

i am curious on it's place throughout the stages of Australian History..i was told by a local from Perth that before 'whitey' came to the island that there were @ 200 'countries' or 'tribes' , spread throughout the entire continent and that the biggest unifying factor between them was worshipping Uluru as sort of its own deity, or i.e. the 201st 'country' where only Uluru can reside.

and these days it's a designated National Park - but is it the case that people climb all over it?

can you elaborate on any of this @Sole Survivor ?
 
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666

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they all have there own landscapes of religious significance i doubt they all new of Uluru.
Australia-Aboriginal-Tribes-Map.jpg
here is a map of all tribes of Australia. all there stories are very interesting there is even one about the time when Tasmania got cut off from the mainland which happened about 10.000 years ago.
 
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yo..these photos are ::playful::

i am curious on it's place throughout the stages of Australian History..i was told by a local from Perth that before 'whitey' came to the island that there were @ 200 'countries' or 'tribes' , spread throughout the entire continent and that the biggest unifying factor between them was worshipping Uluru as sort of its own deity, or i.e. the 201st 'country' where only Uluru can reside.

and these days it's a designated National Park - but is it the case that people climb all over it?

can you elaborate on any of this @Sole Survivor ?

Ive never really been into the whole backgound of the Aborigines/Aboriginals (aka Abo which is pronounced "Ab o") (be careful using the word "abo" around them, they will take it as a sign of disrespect) Yes it is a national park. And yes Uluru is a "sacred site" to the aboriginals. They do have a settlement inside the park i believe but that is for the aboriginals only. No tourists are allowed into that settlement under any circumstances. There is no camping allowed inside the national park but there is a little "tourist town" of sorts outside the park with a couple swank hotels, a caravan park, cafes, restrurants, souvenir shops, a petrol station and a little supermarket, plus a small airport. When i was there last year you could climb it still. But they would close it off after 11am because it would just get to hot. I didnt do the climb but have been told it is quite hard. There is also talk about banning people completely from climbing (the aboriginals dont like it) but i have not heard anything since
 
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outlawloose

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Yes, Abo is definitely a derogatory term these days – on par with chink, nip, nigger, fag, bitch, etc – and is only used by people with zero sensitivity.

Aboriginal history is systematically not taught in Australian schools, so it is very common here for people to not understand their background – and to shy away from the subject completely.
Aboriginal people have lived nomadically in this extremely harsh landscape for over 60,000 years - and like many other indigenous cultures they used creationist stories to orally pass down information for their future generations to live in balance with the land. Each of the language groups/tribes had specific Dreamtime stories about the countries diverse environments, and Uluru is known to be a particularly sacred site to their history.

The name Ayers Rock was slapped on the site in the 1870s named after some a fucking mining magnate from England. Its a hideous comparison of the Western view of land as a market commodity available for shortsited exploitation. Australia still holds a economic dependency on mining the continents precious and finite resources and it's a clear sign of how such things havent changed a bit since England landed here, claimed the land as 'uninhabited', and systematically decimated the indigenous population.

In the 1990s Uluru was allowed to share the naming rights of the rock - now known as Uluru/Ayers Rock - a token gesture considering Aboriginal sovereignty has never been ceded. Australia is the only Commonwealth country to have not signed a treaty with its indigenous people, and that is still evident in how Aboriginal people are still not respected as equal citizens in modern Australian culture. Colonial history in Australia is fucked and disgusting. It has many comparisons to the colonialisation of indigenous people in North America, and while it's not worth comparing who has it worst – all are dominated – I simply look forward to Aboriginal people claiming back at least some of their power as Ive heard Native Americans have succeeding in doing so.

All our colonial foundations are exactly why our Western society is fucked, and is just the reason we need to resign from it, resist it, abandon in, evolve from it.
 

Benji91

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Ive never really been into the whole backgound of the Aborigines/Aboriginals (aka Abo which is pronounced "Ab o") (be careful using the word "abo" around them, they will take it as a sign of disrespect) Yes it is a national park. And yes Uluru is a "sacred site" to the aboriginals. They do have a settlement inside the park i believe but that is for the aboriginals only. No tourists are allowed into that settlement under any circumstances. There is no camping allowed inside the national park but there is a little "tourist town" of sorts outside the park with a couple swank hotels, a caravan park, cafes, restrurants, souvenir shops, a petrol station and a little supermarket, plus a small airport. When i was there last year you could climb it still. But they would close it off after 11am because it would just get to hot. I didnt do the climb but have been told it is quite hard. There is also talk about banning people completely from climbing (the aboriginals dont like it) but i have not heard anything since

Couple quick things on this for anyone who may head out there -
Abo is a slur, don't fucking use it whether you're around "them" or not.
Better to call it Uluru, not Ayers Rock. Dual naming come in decades ago, but the proper name is Uluru.
Respect the indigenous community.
If you want to climb something, go climb the Sydney Harbor Bridge.
https://www.sbs.com.au/nitv/article/2017/10/26/5-reasons-why-you-shouldnt-climb-uluru

If any of ya'll are interested in the real indigenous culture, and associated struggles, Down Under checked this page out - Blackfulla Revolution - great people, lots of good links.

Edit: Sorry for being a bit short with a deleted user, ha.
 

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