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cheap, vegan, & mostly raw

Discussion in 'The Hobo Kitchen' started by unrulywaunder, Oct 27, 2017.

  1. unrulywaunder

    unrulywaunder is getting to know the place

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    I spent about 3 years traveling all around America--from as far North as Denali National Park in Alaska to as far South as Torres Del Paine in Chilean Patagonia. I frequently didn't have access to refrigeration, and I kept it all vegan. Here's how I do it:

    Meal 1: Fruit. Eating 8 bananas is a meal. I leaned this lesson when everything else gave me an upset stomach while in India. After I learned this, I relished the opportunity to eat fruit-only meals when I was in Brazil. For breakfast & lunch I'd eat something like 1 pineapple, 4 mangoes, several bananas, and anything else cheap all mixed together.

    Meal 2: Bread & Veggies. Buy a carrot, a spicy pepper, a tomato, a shallot, a garlic clove, a stick of ginger, and a bullion cube. Cut it all up & mix. Store in a tuperware. If you can, sprout some lentils every few days & add a small handful. Add oil if you got it. It should be eaten in 24 hours, but it would last longer depending on the climate. I usually make a small one of these every day, and I buy the veggies just before I make it. All of these ingredients would last a week without refrigeration. When ready to eat, you could put it between bread to make sandwiches, but I (lazily) usually just eat a spoonful, then a slice of bread, then a spoonful, etc. Make it spicy & use it like an Indian gravy. This spicy veggie mix is usually about a fistful in size, and it's eaten with about a half-loaf of bread. This has been my lunch 90% of the time for the past 3 years.

    If you dumpster the bread, this is a ~$1 meal. I often will go to sandwich shops or grocery store dumpsters & collect the ends of onions/peppers/other veggies that they throw away. Go to taco bell's dumpsters to get packets of hot sauce (though, honestly, if you buy a single, small serrano pepper, I've found that most grocery stores' checkout scales can't measure the weight--so the cashier usually gives it to you for free!) Anyway, If the compost dumpster gods are nice to you, this can be a free meal.

    Meal 3: Nuts/seeds/oats. I usually have a bag of oats, sunflower seeds or pumpkin seeds, & raisins. Get it all raw & unsalted in bulk. I usually mix something like 1 handful of oats, 2 handfuls of raisins, and 5 handfuls of sunflower seeds. This is a meal, not a snack. Make sure to drink more water than usual with this meal (as is always the case when eating unhydrated foods).

    Meal 4: Bread & store-bought condiment. Condiment could be peanut butter, tahini, jam, olive oil, chocolate, hummus, etc.

    My "cooking" set consists of:
    1. A shitty multitool with a knife
    2. A hermetically sealed container (tupperware, etc)
    3. A mini grater (for garlic, ginger, & carrots)
    4. A spoon
    This is a pretty good resource:

    * https://nomadwiki.org/en/Tiny_Guide_for_the_Vegan_Traveler

    Happy vegan travels!
     
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    #1 unrulywaunder, Oct 27, 2017
    Last edited: Oct 28, 2017
  2. OP
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    unrulywaunder

    unrulywaunder is getting to know the place

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    Oh, a note about nutrition: You can get everything you need nutritionally from a vegan diet, except 1 thing: B12. Make sure you take B12 if you're vegan. Get the one that contains Methylcobalamin, else your body will just pee most of it out without absorbing it.

    Though you *can* get everything else from plants, the above-described diet is missing a lot, so I recommend this vegan multivitamin:

    * Deva brand "Vegan Cal-Mag Plus" with Zinc, Vitamin D, & Calcium

    For the ladies who suffer from low iron, you'll want to get a lot of iron in when menstruating, Here's some plants that are super high in Iron:
    1. Chickpeas
    2. Chocolate
    3. Meals cooked in cast iron, especially acidic things
    4. Blackstrap Molasses
    5. Spinach
    So for the ladies with low iron levels doing the vegan diet, I always recommend this meal when menstruating:
    1. a spinach & hummus sandwich
    2. chocolate coconut milk to drink
    3. home-made applesauce cooked in a cast iron skillet & sweetened with blackstrap molasses for dessert
     
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  3. iamwhatiam

    iamwhatiam beach bum
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    how much does your pack weigh with all that?
     
  4. OP
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    unrulywaunder

    unrulywaunder is getting to know the place

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    I don't know about weight, but I traveled with a 40L. So fairly light.

    I wouldn't travel with fruit, for example. I only gorge on fruit when I'm at a grocery store, then proceed to cut up my veggies & store it for the next meal.

    I went backpacking in Patagonia for 10 days with the same 40L pack too, but I had another 20L of stuff strapped on it. Carrying 10 days of food is a lot. I usually only carry enough for 0.5-2 days worth.

    Edit: oh, I'm male-bodied. So I don't have to worry about Iron & I don't carry the items listed under the menstruation diet section. That was just a tip for the ladies. And those items would only need to be purchased once a month.
     
  5. OP
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    unrulywaunder

    unrulywaunder is getting to know the place

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    here's a typical vegan $1 lunch.
     

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  6. Tatanka

    Tatanka Can't get enough of the site

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    Good read. Kind of funny how decent eating can be cheaper than toxic isn't it? Good tips. I always carry a little sealed lid container now doubles as my coffee tea cup and my food soaker. I still have these food urges to defy but I'm gaining on full control
     
  7. Spider Tempura

    Spider Tempura Hungry for Knowledge

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    Great thread. If you spend alot of time visiting the same spots you could also seedbomb some stuff so you have your own lil grocery store in the woods. If you wanna lighten up ur food stores some more you can dry out tons of kale or spinach and maybe even grind it up a bit. Sun dryin tomatoes and apples nanas etc will give ya a few extra days shelf life. Back in the day i tried to be vegan for a spell, longest camping trip i did back than was 4 months, i survived alright but this was also in spring summer in the tropics where free fruit is everywhere. Cant go 10 feet in Florida without tripping over a mango tree or plantino or orange tree lol.

    As far as pack loads go, canned tuna weighs more than a trail blend. If you do a nice well rounded trail mix you can cover most of ur dietary needs. I have several cashew trees stashed on public land now along with sunflowers. My two fav nuts, i add some dried nana n apple, cinnamon, cane sugar, oats, raisens, and beernuts. Cant resist tossin in some of those beernuts. Im not vegan anymore so i also keep some fish dried or smoked when i catch em and usually some snake. For veggies i like carrot n taters but i plant all kinds of stuff when seedbombing cuz u never kno what the next person or animal will want to eat.