jordthecowboy

Lurker
Joined
Sep 12, 2020
Messages
8
Location
toronto
Hey all,

I'm Jordan, a lover of life and a writer of it too. For the record, I'm nonbinary/ trans masc and use they/he pronouns. I've travelled quite a bit in my so-far-short life, by many different means, throughout Canada, Asia, and Europe mostly. I'm living in Toronto right now, finishing up some postgrad schooling, and wondering what the hell I should do next. I'm torn between the security of a life in the system (getting some more credentials, getting into a profession) and the freedom and bliss of a life on the road. A part of me thinks I can make both happen, and I guess so far I kind of have, but we'll see how that continues. Main thing I'm interested in now, travel-wise, is freight hopping. It's something I've always wanted to do, but no one in my life is willing to do it with me, and I'm not reckless enough to go it alone as a first-timer. I'd love to meet some like-minded people out there who could pass on some knowledge and maybe even join me on a trip one day. Please feel free to message me!

Lots of love

Jordan
 
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ali

StP Admin
Admin
Joined
Aug 9, 2020
Messages
46
Location
BC
I turned 40 this year and spent most of my life working regular jobs. Every now and then i quit and swear i'll never go back, i bum around till my money is low, and then i get worried and find another job. Which is to say that it is totally possible to work a regular job and still take comfortable 6-12 month sabbaticals if you have a minimal lifestyle. If you sleep rough, you could go even longer.

Depending on what your career path is, you might be able to wangle a working life on the road. Some internet-based freelancers do it (mostly writers and web developers from what i've seen). On the other hand, even if you are "traveling" while you work, it doesn't really feel the same as traveling without work. If there's a deadline, or a meeting you need to get to, if you need to find a place with fast internet, it kills the feeling of freedom, for me anyway.

An unfortunate thing about building a traditional career is that you kind of get trapped in it. I tried to switch out a few times, but even by my late 20s employers were saying no because i was "overqualified" for whatever casual work they had. So when you're older, and you're hard-up for cash, and every restaurant and manual labor place is turning you down, then you go back to what you know, chalk up another couple years on the résumé, now you dug the hole even deeper.

I am also in Canada and interested in riding trains. They're awesome pieces of machinery. Especially in North America there are so many places you start to walk, then the road ends but the rails keep going. I want to see those places where the roads don't go! I hope i still get the opportunity. There's lots of good info on this site. I suspect this is something easier to do when you are young and fit and don't wake up with aches and pains each day, so i think trying to make that happen now would be better than down the track, whether you choose a traditional career or not. Winter is probably not a good time to start, though.

Sorry i got no clear answers for you, but perhaps sharing my experience helps.
 

jordthecowboy

Lurker
Joined
Sep 12, 2020
Messages
8
Location
toronto
Wow Ali, thanks so much for your reply. It feels good knowing that there are people out there who manage to do both, even if it comes with challenges. I guess no hard answers exist, and if they did, life would be a little boring! But I can form my own answers through hearing stories like these. It really is a huge help. And you make a good point that whether or not I ride trains now doesn’t mean I will or won’t have a traditional career- I can ride trains and still choose either path. Thanks for pointing that out. Hope life is treating you well ,

jordthecowboy
 
Joined
Jan 28, 2008
Messages
888
Location
The woods
If you think road life is all freedom and bliss you're gonna be a little disappointed. Trainriding especially is mostly long periods of being bored and uncomfortable with extreme adrenaline rushes here and there. The upside is you get to see lots of scenery most people never will. The downside is pretty much everything else.
 

jordthecowboy

Lurker
Joined
Sep 12, 2020
Messages
8
Location
toronto
always a good reminder, for sure. I guess it’s the hardship that’s part of the appeal, however... no matter what I hear about it, I can’t shake the feeling that I need to go and do it
 

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