Anyone ride motorcycles? (1 Viewer)

Hudson

Wanderer
Joined
Aug 9, 2018
Messages
207
Location
Norcal
Got myself an old 2006 1100cc honda shadow with low miles on it. Ive put about 3,000 miles on it this year.

I'm looking for advice on camping out on a motorcycle if anyone has any.
 
We sell all kinds of other stuff in our Etsy store!
OP
Hudson

Hudson

Wanderer
Joined
Aug 9, 2018
Messages
207
Location
Norcal
I tend to stay away from traffic, its hard in northern California area but very doable.

The one thing I'm taught as a commercial driver I always try to follow is the 5 keys of the Smith driving system.

Truth be told though about 70% of motorcycle accidents are just the rider and the bike not any outside parties. Sure I ride like a psychopath sometimes but not all the time.
 

James Meadowlark

Sonic Reducer
Joined
Nov 4, 2014
Messages
90
Location
Gainesville, United States
My current ride is an eleven year-old Triumph Bonneville 865cc that I mostly use for commuting. Way better on gas than a car, and far easier to find parking around town. In the last five years, I've camped (short term) for different motorcycle events/festivals around FLA- Just pop my gear in a backpack and go.
 

Groundscore

Rambler
Joined
Aug 13, 2019
Messages
38
Location
Southern Arizona
Pack light and tight, and make sure you have the ability to keep things dry. - That includes yourself.

Take a few short trips first, to get the feel of what you need/don't need and see how things ride. You'll quickly learn better ways of packing stuff from experience.

Bungee cords are your friend, just don't count on a single one, and don't lose an eye to one, and I will add if you have the money, ROK straps are much better.

Watch out for vehicles, as trust me, they won't be watching for you, ever.

Keep the rubber on the road and the shiny side up.
 
D

Deleted member 22934

I deleted myself
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Bad ass man. I got the same bike as you. Except mine is older. Mines a 98. I've lived in vans. I've lived in houses. I've bicycle toured thru Utah, Oregon and Arizona. And the motorcycle really is the way to go. You don't need much money, insurance is cheap... When I was younger, I travelled 14 different states on a rebel 250... That bike had no balls... I could barely keep up with the cars on the freeways... I didn't care man it had 2 wheels and a motor, so I rode that thing all over the country... I remember coming back from Arkansas one time and the wind was blowing really hard the other direction... I had to find the slowest semi on i40 and ride as close behind it as I could to block the wind...

Anyways, I'm starting crl training litterally next Monday... I'm getting to old to live like a motorcycle hobo... I'm gonna be driving semi trucks pretty soon... And riding my bike on my days off... I can't wait to get my license and start the new job... I'm so excited!!!

Anyways, I wish you the best man! Keep us posted on your travels! I'd love to see pictures...
 
Joined
Aug 19, 2019
Messages
2
Age
24
Location
Roseville
I got given a 82 Yamaha maxim 650 ratbike, thing was a shrieking metal suicide machine, and a flying greaseball, but I rode it to sturgis from Austin Texas in a straight shot then up to Seattle, and across all the way to Detroit where it finally broke down. At that point it wasn’t worth the gas it had in the tank, so I just left it on the side of the road, and told a motorcycle shop down the street, gave em the keys and the title and snuck on the greyhound across the road, didn’t look back. All in all I had the time of my life, the plates were wrong, the inspection was out of date, I gas jugged the thing the whole entire way (easiest gas jugging of my life on a motorcycle btw) valve cover gasket was shot so I fed her stolen gas the whole time, I had no drivers license or insurance and I was drunk I think the whole damn way. It was the fucking best.
 
D

Deleted member 22934

I deleted myself
I got given a 82 Yamaha maxim 650 ratbike, thing was a shrieking metal suicide machine, and a flying greaseball, but I rode it to sturgis from Austin Texas in a straight shot then up to Seattle, and across all the way to Detroit where it finally broke down. At that point it wasn’t worth the gas it had in the tank, so I just left it on the side of the road, and told a motorcycle shop down the street, gave em the keys and the title and snuck on the greyhound across the road, didn’t look back. All in all I had the time of my life, the plates were wrong, the inspection was out of date, I gas jugged the thing the whole entire way (easiest gas jugging of my life on a motorcycle btw) valve cover gasket was shot so I fed her stolen gas the whole time, I had no drivers license or insurance and I was drunk I think the whole damn way. It was the fucking best.
I've left m share of bikes on the side of the road too. Shit happens.. In fact, just last year I was in California on an old 86 honda, and the motor threw a rod and blew a big hole out the front of the motor. I left it right there on the side of the highway and started walking...
 

starpurple

Newbie
Joined
Jan 26, 2019
Messages
24
Location
california
i ride a ktm 525 (basically a dirt bike) and go camping a bit with it, but nothing long term usually like a night. I pack a backpack like I would go on a hiking trip, with ultra light equipment. crazy what you can fit in a backpack now days. of course your bike and my bike are very different, but for your bike id get saddle bags.
 
D

Deleted member 22934

I deleted myself
That’s cool man. Those are bad ass bikes. Are you stationary or traveling? Having the consistency of stable living arrangements is such an advantage for so many things... but there’s nothing quite like being on the road... Scooter trash, rubber tramp, motorcycle hobo, whatever the hell you wanna call it... There’s nothing like it... When everything you own fits on a motorcycle, and your just working up enough money to get to the next town... Them were the days... them were the best days and the worst days all at the same time... hahaha
 

Hopper87

Newbie
Joined
Apr 20, 2020
Messages
20
Location
Fargo, ND
Plan this summer is to ship motorcycle to Spokane and trainhop to pick it up and continue trip back through Montana returning home.
 
Joined
Aug 29, 2017
Messages
15
Location
Nowherse Vile, USA
I got a 2000 Dyna convertable that I did all up, I have been thinking of doing some sort of camping but you don't have much room on a Dyna for gear. Truthfully I should look into a Enduro and do some proper offroad camping.
 

Hopper87

Newbie
Joined
Apr 20, 2020
Messages
20
Location
Fargo, ND
I have a Yamaha Raider cruiser and it was fun to hit the open road. Took it on east coast tour from ND to Maine, NYC, Washington DC, and other trips to Montana, Colorado, etc., but I was always passing by interesting unpaved roads up into mountains and such. Broke down and bought KLR650 dual sport and have never looked back. Great decision. I prefer riding the KLR over the Raider now by far for its ease of riding, maneuvering, and functionality hauling stuff. Raider looks cooler, but KLR is like trusty swiss knife and can do it all. Cheap, dependable, good times.
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Cloval

Newbie
Joined
May 19, 2019
Messages
12
Location
Northern, CA
I've done some motorcycle camping trips and would like to do more. I searched for threads, but didn't find much. Other sections maybe?... I recently watched a couple inspiring vids: One guy was traveling through Baja CA and Mexico on an Enduro bike. The other documented two friend traveling the Trans America Trail on WR250s, from the Mississippi River in Arkansas, to the Pacific Ocean in Oregon. Absolutely amazing scenery!

The last trip I took was from Sacramento to the Los Angeles area, May 2018, for a custom motorcycle show in Silverado, CA. I Started the journey on Hwy 99 S, which was uneventful, but crammed with valley commuters. It's an amazing feeling to start a trip while 99% of the public is headed to their work-a-day nonsense. The trip got much more scenic on Hwy 5 south of Stockton and continued that way along 152 W and 101 S until reaching Ventura.

I planned to camp on the coast, and make my way to the show early the next day, but all the grounds were completely full with travelers. Stopping became a gamble. The bike I purchased from a friend 1 month prior, 03 Sportster 1200, bone stock w/15,000 miles, was having trouble starting. I pulled off the highway to a county park with a teenager working the gate. He explained that the grounds were full. I asked him nicely if I could pitch a tent out of the way; it would be dark soon and my bike was having mechanical issues. That idea didn't sit well with him. He was a bit of a square and was probably concerned with losing his job. That's understandable.

Commence Plan B. After a few phone calls I was able to secure lodging with my brother-in-laws parents, super nice people who live in Orange County. A friendly camper heard me on the phone and offered to give me a push start. I rode from Ventura to OC without stopping, and arrived just before it got dark. What a relief!

I had a good idea of what potential problems with the bike were, but the fact that I had to home in 4 days to resume work left me little time to trouble shoot. The next morning I had my bike towed to Orange County Harley Davison and paid the extra bucks for them to find the issue. The voltage regulator was failing, which would not charge the battery, thus the bike was having starting problems. Huge thanks to those super accommodating, friendly people at OC Harley Davidson. Believe it or not, other dealerships in OC refused to take my bike in for service, eventhough I explained that I was only in town for the show and 500 miles from home.

The remainder of the trip was uneventful and relaxing. Went to the show on Saturday afternoon and Sunday morning, met some cool people and saw a lot of very nice machines. Monday arrived and it was time to hit the road. I did not have lodging prepared for my trip back, but I figured I would camp roadside or find a campground. As dusk approached I pulled into San Luis Obispo for fuel. A quick phone search (they are actually good for something) revealed a campground in nearby Morro Bay. Two friendly, female park employees greeted me at the entrance just as the low fog engulfed the area, and there were sites open. Yes! I set up camp and took the bike into the quaint town of Morro Bay for dinner and beers. More welcoming people awaited me at the local brewpub, The Libertine Pub. I was working in the beer industry at the time, and it is a tight nit community, so naturally the staff was eager to talk shop. They even knew some people I had worked with in the past. It was a nice evening of libation and conversation.

I woke the next morning eager to leave the dew and fog. Make no mistake, I thoroughly enjoyed Morro Bay and will sometime return to its laid back vibes. Stop in if you are near. My return trip followed the same route, mostly stopping for fuel/stretch breaks. My bike needs a fill about the time a rest is needed, so it works out perfectly. I made it home by dusk content from the journey.

Moral of the story for OP: motorcycle camping can be done on any bike. Its very similar to backpacking because you are limited on space. I prefer to travel light. Carry some basic tools, extra socks, underwear, t-shirts, some snacks. Water and Gatorade are a must. Layers for under the riding jacket as well. Earplugs and a small amount of hidden cash are helpful.
Never intended for my post to be this long, but I'm trying to contribute here in order to re-enter the freight hopping forum. Safe travels!
 

Hopper87

Newbie
Joined
Apr 20, 2020
Messages
20
Location
Fargo, ND
I have had many great motorcycle trips from ND over the last few years. Million Dollar Highway in Telluride, CO area; Tail of the Dragon road and Cherahola Skyway in TN/NC (including one night at KY Bike Rally in Sturgis, KY on way back); ride to Maine including 5 hrs in downtown Manhattan traffic (my clutch hand workout took months to recover from) and stops in Boston, Washington DC, and Pittsburgh; trips over Beartooth Pass and Chief Joseph passes in MT/WY; trip to Mount Rainier that included crossing 120 mile Magruder Corridor wilderness road; and backcountry journey around MT through various mountain ranges and forests that included a venture into (and back out the same way) a 6100ft abandoned rail tunnel that became impassable due to 2+ft of water for several hundred ft near the end I intended to exit. Been very lucky overall. Had great times. No deer (or moose). No breakdowns. Everything always went well other than the typical minor hiccups, like this picture of a minor teardown under a street lamp to fix an electrical short that blew a fuse. I always look forward to my next motorcycle journey.
 

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