25 tarp shelter configurations (infographic) - what are your favorites? (1 Viewer)

Swimsushi

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Hey yall!

I've been spending my days researching about tents and bivys and now; to tarps. I would like to hear yalls favorite configurations for your DIY tarp tent. I've found this cool photo on rolling fox, and i'm honestly surprised at the many, many ways you can use it for any type of weather.

1596839055869.png
 
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trashswag86

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I posted this on my profile, but since you asked, here it is again: (see the attached picture)

So this net/shade tent plus a Tennier Bivy is how I'm gonna do the elements.

There's lighter tents out there, but the versatility of the bivy (the smallest waterproof "tent" itself) Plus the multiple uses of the poncho makes the actual weight of this system hard to gauge. Being that the rain poncho is also... a rain poncho, which I always already have, means it adds zero weight to my tent system. That's a free 9oz.
Same for my bivy. I always have one, so that's a free 2 lb.
And of course the same would go for the trecking poles, assuming I'm into them.

I've yet to use trecking, and honestly this tent system idea is the only thing tipping me in the direction of getting them. (Well, this and of I decide to go with hiking sandals, which I'm sure would make trek poles a must) I have good balance and fast feet, so I'm a little skeptical that I'll find them that useful. For this reason, until I decide otherwise, I'm including the weight of them as if I only used them for this tent. They may stay in my pack the majority of my hiking. I just don't want to have to rely on finding 4 perfectly distanced trees to pitch this thing.

"Trekking poles and footwear are two of the biggest problem areas when it comes to weight. ...weight carried on your back, once in motion, stays in motion. Any weight carried on your hands or feet must be swung back and forth with each step. Because your hands and feet stop and start much more often in comparison to your torso, any weight carried here requires significantly more energy."

4 guylines ? lb
Net ? lb
Trecking poles 1.3 lb
Total weight: ?

The poncho-tarp provides both shade and a stronger surface to take the strain off the guylines so that the net won't be overstressed. Plus it has multiple uses, including:

a. Poncho,
b. Changing and potty cloak,
c. Tarp for wet ground,
d. (Possibly) a Rain skirt for when its really coming down (an umbrella will cover my top half, plus be used for shade while hiking) I haven't tried this yet, and not entirely sure how I'll keep it in place. Something to mod, maybe. I'd use waterproof socks with this, cause no doubt the rain will just be directed right into my shoes. (I use Rocky gortex socks, since they're a a shell for your regular socks, and so don't require washing. If the combo is to warm for the weather, I'll just wear my knee high pantyhose to wick sweet.

I'll pitch the tarp low and use it to cover my head and pack when it rains, with the rest of my body in a military bivy sack. Obviously no net is needed when its raining.

I might get the overpriced bushbuddy stove ($100 for a price of metal) or build my own gasifier, which will allow me to cook efficiently with twigs while not having to worry about flame or sparks catching the net.
 

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Desperado Deluxe

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That's cool you just gotta remember the more easy it is to set up the more likely it's going to be effective. A lot of those examples are good if your going to leave your tarp up for long periods. Honestly just use mine like a bivy 75% of the time. Burrito fold over setup.
Remember bungee cords and stake save a lot of time securing edges instead of rope. Especially in unfavorable conditions.
 

Odin

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I got a maybe stupid question...

I have good number of tyvek like tarp materials of various sizes... some larger that were used in covering sheet metal.

Now they don't have grommets or anything like that... so... is there an easy way to install some or should I use them as is... like was just thinking bungee cords and making hole in the corners.

whats the best idea here...


and another draw back the are blue and white. well the white side might be good in winter conditions... hahah... then again I'll be IN WINTER conditions...


:🤦:
 

Swimsushi

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I got a maybe stupid question...

I have good number of tyvek like tarp materials of various sizes... some larger that were used in covering sheet metal.

Now they don't have grommets or anything like that... so... is there an easy way to install some or should I use them as is... like was just thinking bungee cords and making hole in the corners.

whats the best idea here...


and another draw back the are blue and white. well the white side might be good in winter conditions... hahah... then again I'll be IN WINTER conditions...


:🤦:
Ive seen the materials at outdoor stores and walmart. Its thr metal grommets and you get a hammer to install it. Im not sure exactly how or why but i know they are common in those stores.
 

Odin

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buying grommets is the obvious idea... thanks yall...

i did remember something was being lazy before...drinkkng does that lol... that would work to in a pinch see if i can find an image....

kinda like making a ball hitch with a stone... if I don't feel like spending money on hardware this could useful for that cheap tyvek material... though grommets would be more convenient.


download.jpg
 

Lamentations

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You just find some reasonably thin trees, or tear some strips off, braid them, and tie them to the ends, then wrap the ropes or the ends of the sheet around the tree and tie a good knot, and the sheet closes over you like a bananna skin.
 

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